Why you should take the tiger academic guide

In a post-Tiger environment, how will academics cope?

We asked five academics who worked with Tiger academics to reflect on what the environment has meant for their profession and what it’s like to be a Tiger academic.

1.

Dr Alistair O’Connor “I used to be an academic and I still am” Dr Alismair O ‘Connor is the managing director of The Tiger Academics, an independent research consultancy based in London.

He is also the founder and chairman of the UK Tiger Academic Network, a UK-based academic community that provides professional development, networking and support for academics in the UK and overseas.

He has been teaching at Oxford since 2014, and has been a lecturer at the University of Sussex since the mid-1990s.

“I have to be extremely careful about what I say to people because it’s all about what they think of me,” he says.

But it’s more than that, because when I see that my colleagues are doing really good work, I see more of a positive message and I see a sense of pride in their work.” “

When people see me on a campus, they think that I’m trying to make a statement.

But it’s more than that, because when I see that my colleagues are doing really good work, I see more of a positive message and I see a sense of pride in their work.”

2.

Dr Mark Stroud “I’m a big fan of the Tiger academic” Dr Mark is an Associate Professor of Political Science at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) at the London School of Economics and Political Science.

His PhD is on Tiger academic governance and he is also a fellow of the International Tiger Academic Council (ITAC).

Dr Mark says that his academic work has been driven by the need to provide students with a better understanding of how academic governance works.

“If they can’t even understand what we’re trying to do, then we’re really in trouble.” “

3. “

If they can’t even understand what we’re trying to do, then we’re really in trouble.”

3.

Dr Nick Hodge “We’ve all got to keep our heads up” Nick H. is a PhD student at SOAS, and an international tiger academic.

His research focuses on how political leaders and the wider public can understand how tiger academics work, what impact it has on them and how the organisation can make a positive impact.

“There is a really great focus on the political side of Tiger, which is very different to academics in general,” he explains.

It’s very difficult, and if they’re really good at it, it can actually work.” “

But I think the reason why it’s so difficult is because Tiger academics are very isolated from political life and so they have to do all their political work online.

It’s very difficult, and if they’re really good at it, it can actually work.”

4.

Dr Daniel Sabin “The Tiger academic’s role is to support and guide” Dr Daniel has been studying tiger academic governance for more than a decade.

His dissertation focused on how the Tiger Academic Alliance (TABA) operates, what the role of the organisation is, how it operates and how its impact is being seen in the wider UK political landscape.

“As an academic, I’m very much aware of how difficult it is to get my research published, and it’s also very difficult to get any support from the wider academic community because Tiger scholars are so secretive about what their views are,” he notes.

5. “

Tigers academics have a very high profile, they are very active in the political world and I think there is a great need for academics to have that kind of support.”

5.

Dr David Jolliffe “It can be very frustrating” Dr David has been researching tiger academic accountability for the last 15 years, working with students at SOES and working with a large international Tiger academic network to address issues surrounding governance and the impact of Tiger academic leadership.

“You have to respect them, respect them and respect them properly. “

Our work has shown that Tiger academics have to work really hard and we need to be very careful about how we interact with them,” he adds.

We have to remember that if we don’t do our job right, we are really in big trouble. “

A lot of it can go wrong, but we have to have a bit more patience because it can happen.

They’re a really tough and resilient group of people and they will fight for what they believe in, and that’s really important.”